Behavioural Science Uncovered
How Incentives Can Change What We Believe with Sandro Ambuehl

How Incentives Can Change What We Believe with Sandro Ambuehl

April 1, 2021

In this episode, which forms part of a series on ethics in behavioural science research, we talk with Sandro Ambuehl from the University of Zürich about his paper “An Offer You Can’t Refuse? Incentives Change How We Inform Ourselves and What We Believe”. To investigate how economic incentives may skew information gathering and beliefs about what a transaction entails, thus affecting the quality of decisions taken by subjects, he presents a model of costly information acquisition in conjunction with behavioural experiments, one of which includes the ingestion of insects in exchange for money. Tune in for a discussion centred around the project’s design, its ethical and logistical considerations, and on the ethics of incentivising subjects in economic experiments more generally.

Awareness Raising Interventions and Meat Consumption with Josh Tasoff

Awareness Raising Interventions and Meat Consumption with Josh Tasoff

February 12, 2021

In this episode, we talk to Josh Tasoff from the Claremont Graduate University. We discuss two of his papers that study if awareness raising interventions can cause people to consume less meat.  

 

 

Associative Memory and Belief Formation with Florian Zimmermann

Associative Memory and Belief Formation with Florian Zimmermann

November 13, 2020

In this episode, we talk to Florian Zimmermann, from the briq Institute on Behavior and Inequality and the University of Bonn about his paper  “Associative Memory and Belief Formation,” co-authored with Benjamin Enke and Frederik Schwerter. The paper experimentally investigates the idea that people are more likely to recollect items that are cued by current … Continue reading Associative Memory and Belief Formation with Florian Zimmermann

Measuring the Welfare Effects of Shame and Pride with Robert Metcalfe

Measuring the Welfare Effects of Shame and Pride with Robert Metcalfe

November 6, 2020

In this episode, we talk with Robert Metcalfe from Boston University about his paper “Measuring the Welfare Effects of Shame and Pride,” which he co-authored with Luigi Butera, William Morrison and Dmitry Taubinsky. To investigate how public recognition can be employed as a vehicle for motivating desirable behaviour, they develop a portable money-metric method to measure … Continue reading Measuring the Welfare Effects of Shame and Pride with Robert Metcalfe

Equilibrium in the Jungle with Ariel Rubinstein

Equilibrium in the Jungle with Ariel Rubinstein

November 6, 2020

In this episode, we are joined by Ariel Rubinstein from NYU and Tel Aviv University, to discuss his paper “Equilibrium in the Jungle,” which appeared in The Economic Journal in 2007. Co-authored with Michele Piccione, the paper constructs a system that is analogous to the conventional ‘exchange economy’ of micro theory, except that the forces governing allocations are … Continue reading Equilibrium in the Jungle with Ariel Rubinstein

Civic Honesty Around the Globe with Michel Maréchal

Civic Honesty Around the Globe with Michel Maréchal

September 26, 2020

In this episode, we are joined by Michel Maréchal from the University of Zurich to discuss his 2019 Science paper “Civic Honesty Around the Globe” co-authored with Alain Cohn, David Tannenbaum and Christian Lukas Zünd. More than seventeen thousand wallets were handed in to reception staff at various institutions in major cities across 40 countries, … Continue reading Civic Honesty Around the Globe with Michel Maréchal

Regressive Sin Taxes with an Application to the Optimal Soda Tax with Dmitry Taubinsky

Regressive Sin Taxes with an Application to the Optimal Soda Tax with Dmitry Taubinsky

September 1, 2020

In this episode, we talk to Dmitry Taubinsky from the University of California Berkeley about his paper “Regressive Sin Taxes, with an Application to the Optimal Soda Tax,” which he co-authored with Hunt Allcott and Benjamin B. Lockwood. This paper develops a theoretical model of an optimal “sin tax” i.e., a tax on goods that … Continue reading Regressive Sin Taxes with an Application to the Optimal Soda Tax with Dmitry Taubinsky

Preferences for Truth-telling with Johannes Abeler and Daniele Nosenzo

Preferences for Truth-telling with Johannes Abeler and Daniele Nosenzo

August 18, 2020

In this episode, we talk to Johannes Abeler from the University of Oxford and Daniele Nosenzo from Aarhus University (formerly, the University of Nottingham) about their paper “Preferences for Truth-telling,” which they co-authored with Collin Raymond. The authors first conduct a meta-analysis with data amalgamated from more than 90 studies across 47 countries and 44,000 participants. They … Continue reading Preferences for Truth-telling with Johannes Abeler and Daniele Nosenzo

Conducting Field Experiments in Education with Sally Sadoff and Andy Brownback

Conducting Field Experiments in Education with Sally Sadoff and Andy Brownback

June 18, 2020

In this episode, we speak with Sally Sadoff from the Rady School of Management, UC San Diego, and Andy Brownback from the University of Arkansas, about their field work with community colleges. They discuss two recent papers they coauthored on the topic. The first paper, entitled “Improving College Instruction through Incentives,” investigates the effect of offering performance-based … Continue reading Conducting Field Experiments in Education with Sally Sadoff and Andy Brownback

Replication Markets with Anna Dreber

Replication Markets with Anna Dreber

May 12, 2020

In this episode, we talk to Anna Dreber from the Stockholm School of Economics about her work on replication markets. In this project, Anna and her co-authors examine if markets can be used to predict whether scientific studies will replicate.

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